30

Snoops and Kommando’s Guide to Halloween

Halloween Safety for Cats

It’s that time of year again to start preparing for Halloween. Of course, this year will be a little different, with social distancing and all. Your gathering may be a lot smaller than in years past.

Pin by Michael E. Porter on  Animaliiiiii...mistiiiiiiiiiiii...insetti...roditori...eccetera..eccetera...  | Cute animals, Animals, Cats and kittens

Don’t let that stop you from having a great time. You can still break out the niptinis and mouse puffs. Some berries would be fun. And don’t forget the pumpkin (you can eat it after the party.) Helpful hint: If you don’t have enough mouse, you can substitute any finely chopped meat.

Cat drinking game. Every time they say "here kitty" you have to take a drink.  - Lolcats - lol | cat memes | funny cats | funny cat pictures with words on

You’ll need to make the niptinis ahead of time. All you need to do is put a couple of pawfuls of catnip in a pot of boiling water. Turn down the heat and let it simmer for 5 minutes. Repeat for every two guests. Remove it from the stove and refrigerate.

Can Cats Drink Tea? Find the Purrfect Tea for Your Feline Friend

Just before the party pour the niptinis into bowls. Be sure everyone gets some of the leaves. The fortuneteller will need them later.

Ten Pictures of Cats Reading Books Trying to Educate Themselves

As you know, we refuse to wear clothing of any type. Therefore, we are not offering any suggestions for costumes. However, we hope that you will not go as any type of food or a dog. Too embarrassing.

Mods asleep upvote cat dressed as dog. #dogs #pets #dog #Adopt #love #cute  #animals #puppy | Cute cat costumes, Cat costumes, Cute cats

Some cats have a dance contest. If you want to do this, we recommend that you wait until the ‘nip has had a chance to work. Most cats don’t like to dance.

Untitled | Interpretive dance, Funny dance quotes, Dancing cat

Another idea is a seance. If you do try to reach a departed relative, avoid the ones who talked constantly or were whiners. You’re supposed to be having fun.

Coworker threw a b-day party. For her cat. | GBCN

Whatever you do, have a great time this year. And remember, if you need to distance from a stranger, it’s three body-lengths of the average cat or two body-lengths of the bigger breeds.

Practice social distancing in 2020 | Cat diy, Cat items, Cats

All pictures courtesy of Google Images

2

The Return of Roka Blue

If I can get raspberries in February in Michigan, why can’t I get Kraft Roka Blue Cheese spread? Or pumpkin-flavored cream cheese spread? Or eggnog? If everybody hates fruitcake, why do we still sell all of that candied fruit? If there are still people out there who like it, why are they only allowed to like it at the end of the year?

A true indicator of the holiday season at Ralph’s is the arrival of the Roka Blue spread. It comes in one of those little 7 oz. glass jars that are so small in diameter that getting out anything past the first inch is a major accomplishment. I usually give those projects to my husband who has much more patience at it than I do. Don’t suggest that I just break the jar. I have dropped it from various heights at work, and the jar is indestructible. It’s easier to break a cream-cheese tub. Trust me.

Anyway, I digress. These spreads come in three flavors: Pimento, Old English, and Roka Blue (oddly, I couldn’t find pimento on the Kraft site). The Pimento and Old English are available year-round. We carry the Roka Blue for about four months around the holidays. Why the difference? Because people like to make blue cheese balls for the holidays. Huh? They also like to make cheddar balls for the holidays, but that doesn’t mean we only carry that part of the year. I can’t remember the last time someone offered me something with pimento as the main ingredient (but I think I was still in grade school). Pimento sells more poorly than either of the other two flavors. The Kraft website carries 20 recipes for Roka Blue and only 8 for Old English. I figure there must be a conspiracy against the blue cheese, keeping it off the shelf. Or parochialism. The “real” bleu cheese gets to stay all year.

The customers who are upset about the absence of blue cheese spread in the summer have kindred spirits with the people who like pumpkin cream cheese. It is an eagerly anticipated October arrival each year. I don’t really understand the attraction. But I don’t understand the attraction of vegetable cream cheese either. If I’m going to eat something as decadent as cream cheese, I don’t want it to taste healthy. It isn’t like the pumpkin industry isn’t doing it’s part to keep it on the shelves. There are recipes for pumpkin pancakes, soups, chili, and lasagne. Canned pumpkin is available all year. But pumpkin can’t seem to break out of the “seasonal food” category.

The one food that appears this time of year to the most fanfare is eggnog. You can’t go anywhere social without someone offering a glass of it. There are recipes for pancakes, cookies, cakes, and other treats. However, if there was ever a product that is associated with Christmas, it’s eggnog. Probably some leftover tradition from the days when people could only afford something that extravagant once a year (back when they actually used eggs and cream to make it – the alcohol continues to be authentic). You never see anyone being kissed under mistletoe in July either. Or having a cup of wassail.

We can’t have chestnuts roasting on an open fire anymore. Most of us don’t have open fires. And most of the chestnut trees were killed by a fungus at the beginning of the 20th century. But that’s OK with me. When I was little, my mother bought some roasted chestnuts from a street vendor. I don’t know whether it was the vendor or the chestnuts, but they were soggy and bitter.

I think marzipan has suffered a similar decline in popularity. My mother’s mother and aunts used to make mountains of marzipan oranges, strawberries, and other fruits. They were absolutely gorgeous. And tasted like bitter almonds. I do not have the time or patience to make something I don’t want to eat. Besides, who would want to eat something that looked like a fur-ball (which is as close as I’d get to making an orange)?

As I’ve been writing this, I realized that I don’t like most of these foods. I love bleu cheese, but think that cheese spread is mutant. I have tried eating various treats over the years and always gagged at the taste of pumpkin even when it wasn’t identified (a major surprise since I love squash and am addicted to sweets). Eggnog contains two of my least favorite food (eggs and milk/cream). I love almonds as a nut, but find them overwhelming in a lot of recipes.

So I’m wondering. Is there a way to make horseradish seasonal and get it out of my coleslaw (where it makes my tongue swell)? How about arugula? Of all the greens in the world, who decided that bitter was needed in salads for diversity? Maybe chocolate-tasting (not chocolate) foods?