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Cats’ Top 40

No It's my turn to listen to music - Lolcats - lol | cat memes ...

Most of you have spent hours listening to your human’s crummy music. We’ve decided to share some of our own favorite tunes.

Japanese SAKE Cat Toys with silvervine. Best Toys For Cats ...

My Silver vine (Beach Boys “409”)

She’s real fine, my silver vine

She’s real fine,  my silver vine

Silver vine

Did my purring and did my mews

And before too long, I got the news

I’d be getting my very own silver vine

Rev me up, rev me up, rev me up silve rvine

Rev me up, silver vine

Rev me up, silver vine

Nothing can beat it

Not even catnip

Rev me up

Rev me up

Rev me up

Rev me up

Cute white cat cuddles with human dad to sleep - Imgur

Owner of a Lonely Guy (Yes, Owner of a Lonely Heart)

Love me now

You sit there all alone

Waiting to hear your phone

Feed me now

I’ll always love you, man

More than any girl can

Pet me now

It always makes me purr

I can make you feel better than her.

Nap with me now.

You’ll feel better then.

Like the best of men.

 

Owner of a lonely man,

Owner of a lonely man,

Better than the owner of a busy man,

Owner of a lonely man.

Cat Psychology: The Gift - Dog Gone Walking & Cat Care, Kitchener ...

Stray Cat (Elvis Presley, Hound Dog)

You ain’t nothing but a stray cat,

Yowling on the fence.

You ain’t  nothing but a stray cat,

Yowling all the time.

You ain’t given me no dead mice, so you ain’t no tom of mine.

Is it safe to feed fish to cats? | Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Feed Me Do (Beatles, Love Me Do)

Feed, feed me do

Before I faint on you

You know that it’s true,

So, please feed me do.

Now, now, now, feed me do.

Something to eat,

Something to chew,

Something to eat,

Mackerel will do.

Feed Me Do.

Oh, feed me do.

Catnip: Why Is It Driving Your Cat Crazy? | Purina

Nip is the Drug (Roxy Music, Love is the Drug)

(Sorry, I couldn’t get the video to transfer)

I prowl around the marketplace.

Know just what I’m looking for.

Nip is the herb that I need to find

Sniff around,  ask around, where to go?

I finally find it and make a score.

Sniff it, eat, roll on the floor,

Nip is the drug that I adore.

 

Cute Kitty - 20 Cute Animals Waving Hello to You | UnMotivating ...

Videos courtesy of YouTube

Pictures courtesy of Google Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Calliope, Calliope, Wherefore Art Thou?

A few years ago, I realized that I had not seen a calliope in a very long time. In fact, my kids don’t even know what it is. How can it be that hundreds of thousands of Americans don’t know what a calliope is? Next thing I know, someone will say they don’t know what a harpsichord does.

When I was little, my dad worked for a large company that had an annual picnic at a nearby lake. It was a big deal – games, food, beer tent (Dad’s favorite). And a calliope.

I looked up the definition of calliope. It is a musical instrument that produces sound by sending steam or compressed air through large whistles. It also said that calliopes are very loud; some small ones are audible for miles. There is no way to vary tone or loudness. The only variables are the timing and duration of the notes. Don’t see any popularity issues there. Sounds like a lot of the kids who come through the store.

Calliopes must be tuned often to create quality sound (probably an oxymoron). The pitch is affected by the temperature of the steam, so tuning is almost worthless anyway. They decided to just tell people that those off-pitch notes were just a part of the instrument’s charms. It’s a good thing that rationalization has never caught on for singing.

Interesting note: The calliope was patented by Joshua Stoddard on October 9, 1855. (Start planning your anniversary celebrations now!) He planned for it to replace the bells at church. I don’t know what type of church Mr. Stoddard attended, but I can’t imagine waking up to the sound of a calliope playing two miles away. Or listening to it chime every hour. I’m thinking the people would have sent Joshua from his home in Worcester, MA, to somewhere on the open prairie.

Apparently a calliope can either be played by hand or mechanically. I read that calliopes began using music rolls starting in the 1900’s. The ones I saw always had human players. I wonder if the musicians were just pretending to play. How disillusioning.

The real reason for the demise of the calliope seems to have been the replacement of steam power by things that didn’t get into our lungs and try to kill us. No steam, nothing to drive the music. I think it was a conspiracy by the same people who don’t want Harleys driving through their subdivisions at 3a.

The only calliope-maker in the world right now lives in Peru, Indiana. So it appears that the instrument will not be making a comeback any time soon. It’s probably just as well. Who needs another type of loud discordant music floating around?

 

 

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Please Stop the Music

Disclaimer: I have always been unable to study with music on if it had lyrics; I wanted to listen to the words. I may be genetically incapable of ignoring background music. 

The eighties are alive and well at Ralph’s (the pseudonym for the store where I work). Sometimes the music they play sounds like a Top 40’s list from 1984. (I guess that ages me since I don’t remember the last time I heard the phrase Top 40.) As hard as I have tried, I cannot find any type of research that says a constant stream of Billy Joel and Huey Lewis induces people to buy more lettuce and canned corn.

Don’t get me wrong. I really like some of the music. But I remember a business trip I took to Toledo one time. I only lived a couple of hours away, so I drove. I made the mistake of taking more than one album (age alert!) by the same artist with me. It was months before I could listen to some of the songs.

The first year I was there, I only noticed the Christmas music. There really are a limited number of songs a retail store can play at Christmas without offending someone. When you’re open 24/7 and start playing the music right after Thanksgiving, everyone’s teeth are on edge by December 24. So they decide to extend the “mood” by continuing to play it until January 1.

Then I noticed that we also have patriotic music on Independence Day (July 4th). There is a seriously limited supply of patriotic music. Once you get past the anthems for each branch of the military, the Sousa marches, and America the Beautiful, the pickings get slim. Stars and Stripes Forever and the Washington Post March start to sound an awful lot alike by the fourth or fifth repetition.

It was last fall that I started to realize that some of the songs were on heavy rotation (yes, another phrase from the 80’s). I know that stores pay a service to get a certain package of music, so I wasn’t really surprised by the repetition. I just started started wondering why they would choose what they did. Maybe it’s cheaper to get older music? I guess the 80’s were when music started splintering into so many genres, so maybe they were looking for something generic. I just wonder if they really know what they got.

For example, fairly regularly we get to hear Ballroom Blitz by Sweet (1973). I’ve loved the song since the first time I heard it, but as music to shop by?

What about My Sharona by The Knack (1979)? Has anyone listened to the lyrics? They’re a little suggestive.

Or Rock the Casbah by The Clash (1982)? For one thing, people really don’t hear that first word well. More than one has thought it was F*** the Casbah, which would really be in poor taste. But the rest of the lyrics are pretty iffy too, if you actually listen to them. And the video is worse:

I’m going to end with another song that we hear a lot, although it’s from the 60’s. I really like it, but right now it hits a little close to home.

On the other hand, any of it is better than the Muzak stores played in the 80’s.